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Today’s Child Tax Credit Versus the Family Security Act 2.0

Scott Santens
Scott Santens
2 min read
Today’s Child Tax Credit Versus the Family Security Act 2.0
Photo by Heike Mintel / Unsplash

The enhanced child tax credit whose monthly cash payments of $250 to $300 per kid cut child poverty by a third, did not reduce employment, did not contribute to inflation, but did increase entrepreneurship, and did decrease drug use, and did decrease the number of parents selling their plasma to feed their kids, expired in January 2022 and unfortunately seems unlikely to be restored. So what now? What options are there for something better than what we have now, that could actually pass through Congress to be signed into law anytime soon? One newer option is Mitt Romney’s Family Security Act 2.0 (FSA2). This post will explain some of the key differences that set it apart from the existing child tax credit set to expire in 2025.

Read this post in its entirety on the Humanity Forward blog.

Today’s Child Tax Credit Versus the Family Security Act 2.0
The big question is what is politically possible in a time of record-high partisanship? Is it possible for Congress to get together along bipartisan lines to help America’s children, who by no fault of their own are being hit with the effects of child poverty, and whose effects we will all pay for a…

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Unconditional basic income (UBI) advocate with a crowdfunded basic income; Author of Let There Be Money; Senior Advisor to Humanity Forward; BasicIncomeToday.com editor; Fund for Humanity board member